eGovernance in India

Improving eGovernance in INDIA

Letter dated October 19th 2005 on Northeast States Community Information Centers(CIC’s) established by NIC / Why not promote NIC and give full authority to NIC // CLOSE NISG??

Posted by egovindia on July 4, 2006

Date: Wed, 19 Oct 2005 05:58:43 -0700 (PDT)

From: eGov INDIA <egovindia@yahoo.com>
Subject: Northeast States Community Information Centers(CIC’s) established by NIC / Why not promote NIC and give full authority to NIC // CLOSE NISG??
To: eGov INDIA egovindia@yahoogroups.com
CC: mos@mit.gov.in, pmosb@pmo.nic.in, soniagandhi@sansad.nic.in,
secretary@mit.gov.in, dg@nic.in, rgilani@mit.gov.in, phadke@mit.gov.in,
jsegov@mit.gov.in, ksdir@hub.nic.in, moni@hub.nic.in, mohan@tn.nic.in,
lalitha@hub.nic.in, pspillai@hub.nic.in, kashinath@hub.nic.in,
srinath@mit.gov.in, ceo@nisg.org, vs@nisg.org, piyush.gupta@nisg.org,
bala.srinivas@nisg.org, devajoy.choudhury@nisg.org,
sachdeva.sameer@nisg.org, sachdeva_sameer@yahoo.co.in

Dear eGovINIDA Members,

Take a look at what NIC has done since 1976. Wonderful acheivement for INDIA.

Why DIT is not talking about what NIC has done all over INDIA on these projects? Any reason? Expecially in North East States and J & K.

DIT can’t decide the 100,000 CSC’s sitting in a HOTEL or in an OFFICE.

NIC has gone to actual places and States and Cities and Districts.

Do JS R. Chandrashekar talk about this in his articles or his speeches to people. Does he tell the Minister of DIT. Why he can’t respond to emails?

Does the DIT Secretary talk about this?

Does Dr. M. S. Swaminathan talk about this ? It looks like 100,000 CSC’s are under this person’s name. This person is being promoted by MICROSOFT. M$ has funded this persons NGO. All know about it. Why do we have to believe this NGO?

Does the ONE WORLD ASIA talk about this now?

WHY NIC can’t be made as THE LEAD AGENCY to do eGovernance ?

WHY R. Chandrashekar is only promoting NISG ?

WHY this was not discussed in a recently concluded Conference where Brijesh Kumar and Chandrashekar attended and issued statements.

WHY DIT is promoting Dr. M. S. Swaminathan Foundation? Are there any deals made between DIT, Secretary, Joint Secretary, NISG and otehrs with Dr. MSSS ?

DIT and concerned authorities need to respond. This is serious issue.

eGovINDIA group expects answers from DIT, Secretary, Joint Secretary to these. CAn’t keep quiet.

____________________________________________________________________

Community Information Centers – Developed by NIC

http://www.cic.nic.in/welcome.asp

________________________________________________________________________

..

Arunachal State WebSite
http://www.cic.nic.in/aruna1.htm

| CIC Blocks | | Block Addresses | | District Map |

 Arunachal State WebSite

State Government Notifications/Press Releases

Jammu & Kashmir ::
ArunachalPradesh ::
Assam::
Nagaland::
Manipur::
Meghalaya::
Tripura::
Mizoram::
Sikkim::

 

Arunachal Pradesh, ‘the land of the dawn lit mountains’, is one of the most pristine areas in India. The history of Arunachal Pradesh is a virtual treasure trove of myths and fascinating traditions, but the recorded history of this state is available only from the 16th century onwards, when the Ahom kings began to rule Assam. Since 1947, it was a part of the North East Frontier Agency and was later made a Union Territory. Arunachal Pradesh was made a full fledged state on 20th February, 1987.

Tribal dancer Arunachal Pradesh is skirted by Bhutan on the west, China on the north-east, Myanmar on the east and by the Indian state of Assam on the southern side. It mainly consists of verdant mountainous ranges sloping to the plains of Assam, and has the largest area in the north-east region.

94 percent of the population in the state lives in the rural belt. Agriculture is the main occupation of the people of Arunachal Pradesh. The principal crop of this area is rice, and other important crops include maize, millets, wheat, pulses, potato, sugarcane and oilseeds. The ecological conditions are suitable for horticulture and fruits like pineapple, orange, lemon, papaya, plum, pear, guava, cherries, walnut and peach thrive here.

Arunachal Pradesh is well endowed with an abundant forest cover, mineral, and hydel power resources. Coal reserves of the state comprising of the Namchik-Namphuk coal mine in Tirap district, are estimated at 90 million tonnes and the crude oil reserves are estimated to be 1.5 million tonnes. Deposits of dolomite, limestone, graphite, quartzite, kyanite, mica, iron and copper are also reported to be found here.

The greatest attraction of the state is its dazzling array of flora and fauna, in a habitat that combines glacial terrain, alpine meadows, and sub-tropical rain forests. Places of tourist interest in the state include Bomdila, Tawang and the nearby Buddhist monastery, which happens to be the largest in India. Itanagar is famous for its excavated ruins of the historical Ita Fort, and the attractive Gyaker Sinyi or the Ganga Lake. Malinithan and Bhismaknagar are the two important archaeological sites in the state, and Parashuram Kund is a prominent pilgrimage site. Namdapha Wildlife sanctuary in the Changlang district is home to the rare Hoolock gibbon.

_______________________________________________________________

..

 Assam State Web Site
http://www.cic.nic.in/assam1.htm

| CIC Blocks | | Block Addresses | | District Map |

 Assam State Website

Jammu & Kashmir::
ArunachalPradesh ::
Assam::
Nagaland::
Manipur::
Meghalaya::
Tripura::
Mizoram::
Sikkim::

 

The word ‘Assam’ is derived from the Sanskrit word ‘Asoma’, meaning peerless. The land of Assam, is in fact, peerless, judging by her exquisite natural beauty, cultural richness and human wealth. Assam has a rich legacy of culture and civilisation behind her. Home to different races of men – Austric, Mongolian, Dravidian, and Aryan, who came to dwell in these hills at different points of time, Assam has developed a composite culture of variegated colour.

Assam, which is situated in the north-east corner of India is surrounded by Bhutan and Arunachal Pradesh on the north, Nagaland and Manipur on the east, Meghalaya and Mizoram on the south and Bangladesh, Tripura and West Bengal on the west. A narrow strip of sub – mountainous region of the Himalayas, connects Assam to the Indian mainland. The state is dominated by the river Brahamputra, whose lush 700 kilometre valley is sandwiched between the Himalayan foothills to the north, and the hills and plateau of Meghalaya to the south.

Important tourist centres of the state around Guwahati are Kamakhya Temple, Umananda (Peacock Island), Navagraha (Temple of nine planets), Gandhi Mandap, State Zoo, State Museum, Sukreswar Temple, Geeta Mandir, Madan-Kamdev Temple and Saraighat Bridge. In the rest of the state the places of tourist interest are Kaziranga park (famous for one horned rhinos), Sib Sagar (Shiv Temple), Majuli (largest river island in the world), Chandubi lake, Batadrava (Birth place of great Vaishnav Saint Sankardev), and Saulkuchi (renowned for its silk industry).

..

Nagaland State WebSite
http://www.cic.nic.in/naga1.htm

| CIC Blocks | | Block Addresses | | District Map |

 Nagaland State WebSite

Jammu & Kashmir::
ArunachalPradesh ::
Assam::
Nagaland::
Manipur::
Meghalaya::
Tripura::
Mizoram::
Sikkim::

 

One of the smallest states of the Indian Union, Nagaland is almost unexplored, as far as tourist destinations are concerned. A starkly remote terrain and scenery makes Nagaland, a place worth a visit for those adventurous in spirit.

Situated in the north eastern corner of the country, Nagaland has Assam, Arunachal Pradesh and Manipur on its domestic borders, while Myanmar shares with it, an international boundary on the east. Nagaland lies to the South of Jorhat in Assam, and is home to myriad tribes and sub tribes. The Naga Hills run through this small state, which has Saramati as its highest peak at a height of 12,600 ft. The main rivers that flow through Nagaland are Dhansiri, Doyang, Dikhu and Jhanji.

Nagaland comprises the former Naga hills districts of Assam and the former Tuensang frontier divisions. Administered earlier by the President, Nagaland was made a state on 1st December 1963. Nagaland is divided into the six main districts of Mokokchung, Tuensang, Mon, Wokha, Zunheboto, and Kohima.

The Nagas are a handsome and friendly people. High cheek bones, almond eyes, sparkling teeth and bronzed skin set the Nagas apart. In colourful tribal outfits, with bamboo shields sheathed in bear skin and decorated spears, the Nagas are simple people, almost entirely tribal. There are 16 tribes, each having its own dialect, customs and traditional costumes, with the common link being their passion for music, dance and pageantry. The social position of a Naga is borne out by the number of bone necklaces he wears.

Weaving is a traditional art handed down through generations in Nagaland. Each of the major tribes has its own unique designs and colours. Warm and colourful Naga shawls, handwoven shoulder bags, decorative spears, table mats, wood carvings and bamboo works make magnificent souveniers.

Tribal dances of the Nagas give us an insight into the inborn reticence of these people. War dances and dances belonging to distinctive tribes, form the major art form in Nagaland. In colourful costumes and jewellery, the dancers go through amazing mock war motions, that could prove very dangerous, if one were to be a little careless. Festivals, marriages, harvests, or just the joy of the moment – are occasions for the Nagas to burst into dance. Some of the important festivals are Sekrenyi, Moatsu, Tuluni and Tokhu Emong.

Situated at the southern tip of the state, overlooking the valley, is the mountainous capital, Kohima. Kohima does not have monuments, monasteries or temples to offer by way of stock tourist attractions. However the unhurried pace of life, calm and serene environs and fresh, unpolluted air makes a welcome change for a jaded city dweller. The Second World War Cemetery in Kohima, the State Museum and the Zoo are the principal places of interest here. Excursions from Kohima lead to Khonoma village, Japfu peak, Dzakou Valley and Mokokchung.

Cultivation on terraced fields, and in some cases Jhum or the shifting system of cultivation, is followed by the people in this state. Rice is the important foodgrain. The process of industrialisation of the state is in its infancy, but the need to have more industries has been recognised. There are several plans on the anvil to increase industrial investment in the State.   

________________________________________________________________________

..

Manipur CICs
http://www.cic.nic.in/mani1.htm

| CIC Blocks | | Block Addresses | | District Map |

 Manipur CICs

Jammu & Kashmir::
ArunachalPradesh ::
Assam::
Nagaland::
Manipur::
Meghalaya::
Tripura::
Mizoram::
Sikkim::

 

An alluring atmosphere of mystery, a land wrapped in velvety silence, is what instantly strikes a visitor to Manipur, which literally means ‘the land of jewels’. Described by Lord Irwin as the ‘Switzerland of India’, Manipur boasts of an exotic landscape with gently undulating hills, emerald green valleys, blue lakes and dense forests. It is the sheer tranquility enveloping it, interrupted only by a soft breeze, that sets it apart from the other North-Eastern states, and makes it the ideal getaway.

Bound by the states of Nagaland, Assam and Mizoram, Manipur shares an international boundary on the east with Myanmar. It is geographically divided into two distinct tracts – hills and plains. Predominantly a hill state, it is watered by the rivers Imphal, Iril, Thoubal, Irang and Barak, all of which flow from north to south.

Originally a princely state, Manipur was ruled by a succession of kings, who were descendants of Pakhangba, an Indian adventurer. The dynasty reigned uninterrupted, for a long time, till Manipur was made an integral part of the Indian Union, in 1949.

The characteristics of the Manipuri people vary according to geographical divisions. The Meitees who speak Manipuri, inhabit the plains, while the Kukis and Nagas of the hills, speak different Tibeto – Burmese dialects. Early Manipuris were followers of Hinduism, and believed in the hierarchy of the Gods. The advent of Christianity resulted in the conversion of the people residing in the hills, while the majority of men from the plains continued to be Hindus. Manipuris are enthusiastic polo players, and the game of polo is said to have originated here. ‘Mukna – Kangjei’, Manipuri free style hockey – cum – wrestling and ‘Yubi-Lakpi’, a game involving coconut – snatching, are traditional Manipuri games that are simply fascinating to watch.

In the field of art and culture, Manipur is best represented by the classical Manipuri style of dance. A style peculiar to itself, its inspiration is purely religious, and the dance usually relates to the Raas Lila, the love story of Radha and Krishna. Lai Haroba (feast of dances, representing celebrations of Gods / Goddesses), Pung Cholem (Mridanga dance), Mao Naga dance, the Priestess dance of Malbe Jagoi, Thangal Surung dance etc. reflect the vibrant culture of the 29 different tribes of Manipur. Witnessing the exquisite Manipuri dance – drama, in its original colourful settings, is simply an unforgettable experience.

Important festivals of Manipur are the Dol Yatra (Holi) in March, Rath Yatra (Car fesival) in June-July and Durga Puja in September-October. Manipuri Hindus celebrate New Year Day, in the second week of April.

The handlooms and handicrafts of Manipur are renowned all over the country. Every house possesses a loom, and Manipuris weave with a passion and style, unrivalled by any other state. Manipuri bed covers of Moirangfee and flower designs, silk and cotton sarees, scarves, blankets and shawls, in distinctive shades and weaves, make for an enchanting collection. A wide range of artistic handicrafts from bamboo, papier mache, decorative ivory, dolls and jewellery make for prized souvenirs. These exquisite handlooms and handicrafts are sold at Khwairamband market, the largest exclusive women’s market in the country, which is a must on every visitor’s itinerary.

Agriculture and allied activities is the single largest source of livelihood, for a majority of the rural masses, and is also the mainstay of the state economy. Industry in Manipur is not very well developed. However, the state is now making rapid strides towards industrialisation, with the setting up of many large and small scale industrial units. The main industries of Manipur are pharmaceuticals, steel re-rolling, plywood, bamboo chipping, cement, vanaspati and electronics.

Manipur has a lot to offer to tourism enthusiasts. Imphal, the beautiful capital city in the valley; Mao and Ukhrul, the picturesque hill resorts; Taminglong, with its exotic landscape; Chandel, home to amazing tribes; Khonggom and Moirang, reminders of the British Raj in India; and a glimpse into the neighbouring country of Burma, through Moreh town on the border… a visit to these magnificent places, leaves a lingering impression on the mind of the visitor.

_______________________________________________________________________

..

Meghalaya State WebSite
http://www.cic.nic.in/megha1.htm

| CIC Blocks | | Block Addresses | | District Map |

 Meghalaya State WebSite

Jammu & Kashmir::
ArunachalPradesh ::
Assam::
Nagaland::
Manipur::
Meghalaya::
Tripura::
Mizoram::
Sikkim::

 

Meghalaya or ‘abode of the clouds’, is a source of inspiration to any poet, a dramatic canvas for an artist’s dream, and the ideal retreat for people in search of beauty and solitude. Declared as a state on 21st January, 1972, Meghalaya is one of the most picturesque states of India, offering a spectrum of sylvan surroundings, rich cultural heritage, misty heights, breathtakingly beautiful waterfalls, luxurious vegetation, flora and fauna.

Carved out of the former state of Assam, Meghalaya is one of the seven sister states of the North-Eastern region, bordered by Assam in the north and Bangladesh in the south. Meghalaya is divided into five administrative districts of the Jaintia hills, East and West Garo hills and East and West Khasi hills. It is among the wettest places on earth – little wonder that Meghalaya means, Abode of Clouds. The state has a picturesque colonial capital, Shillong, and is home to an extraordinary diversity of people, which includes the Khasia, Jantia and Garo tribes.

Meghalaya experiences the two seasons, of winter and monsoon, and is characterised by a cool climate throughout the year. The Cherapunjee – Mawsynram belt in the southern slopes of Khasi Hills records the heaviest rainfall in the world. Numerous rivers flow through Meghalaya, although none of them are navigable, due to rocky beds and strong currents.

A predominantly tribal population, the original inhabitants of this state are Khasis, Jaintias and Garos. Khasis and Jaintias trace their ancestry to the Mongolian race, while the Garos belong to the Tibeto-Burman race. Their cultural traits and ethnic origins remain distinctive, mainly due to their geographical isolation. The Khasi language spoken here, is believed to be one of the few surviving dialects of the Mon-Khmer family of languages, in India.

A common cultural tradition of all the tribes of Meghalaya is the matriarchal law of inheritance by which, custody to property and succession of family position runs through the female line, passing from the mother to the youngest daughter, instead of the male line as is common elsewhere in the country.

Short, muscular, robust and of complexions that vary from fair to dark brown, the tribal people of Meghalaya are sociable, cheerful, hardworking and great lovers of music and beauty. A unique characteristic is their habit of chewing unripe betelnut with dried tobacco, betel leaves and lime. The traditional costume of this place is the ‘Jainsem’ and the ‘Dhara’, though the younger generation has now taken to western clothes. The common food of the people is rice with meat and fish preparations. Rice beer is a favourite drink among the menfolk.

The majority of the population here has converted to Christianity, while non-Christians continue to worship, and practice old cultural beliefs. Colourful dances and festivals of the tribals, vary according to the region and tribe to which they belong.

The Government of Meghalaya, in order to render the festivities a major tourist attraction, organises annual festivals. Festivals, apart from those of the Christian faith, are held to signify occasions where ancestral spirits are appeased, following sowing and harvesting. Ka Pomblang Nongkrem, popularly known as the Nongkrem dance, is one of the most important festivals of the Khasis. It is held as a thanksgiving ceremony to God Almighty, for the harvest and as a prayer for peace and prosperity. Shad Sukmynsiem is another important festival of the Khasis. Behdiengkhlam, the most significant festival of the Jaintias is celebrated annually at Jowai in Jaintia Hills, during the month of July. The prominent festival of the Garos is Wangala, observed to honour and offer sacrifices to their principal deity, Saljong (Sungod).

Agriculture is the main occupation of Meghalaya, with eighty three percent of the total population, dependent on it for their livelihood. Rice and maize are the major food crops. Important fruits grown here are orange, pineapple, lemon, guava, jackfruit and bananas, while potato, jute, mesta, cotton, arecanut, ginger, turmeric, betel leaf and black pepper are the chief commercial crops. ‘Jhum’ or the shifting system of cultivation is being replaced with scientific methods, bringing land under permanent cultivation. Forest resources from pine and other timber products bring in the major chunk of state revenue. The state has many small scale industries in furniture making, iron and steel fabrication, tyre retreading and baking, to name the principal ones.

Meghalaya is dotted with a number of divine tourist spots, where Nature unveils herself in all her glory. Shillong, the capital city has a number of beautiful sites like, Ward’s lake, Lady Hydari park, Polo ground, Mini zoo, Elephant falls and Shillong peak, overlooking the city and the golf course, one of the best in the country. 

_________________________________________________________________________

..

Tripura State WebSite
http://www.cic.nic.in/tripura1.htm

| CIC Blocks | | Block Addresses | | District Map |

 Tripura State Web Site

Jammu & Kashmir::
ArunachalPradesh ::
Assam::
Nagaland::
Manipur::
Meghalaya::
Tripura::
Mizoram::
Sikkim::

Tripura is a land of transition; a satisfying compromise between the old order and the new; a fusion of styles and cultures of the hills and plains. Previously a princely state, and subsequently a Union Territory of Independent India, Tripura was elevated to the status of a state on January 21, 1972.

Tripura is mainly a hilly territory with altitudes varying from 50 to 3080 ft above sea level, though the major population of the state lives in the plains. Characterised by moderate temperatures and highly humid atmosphere, Tripura is best visited after the south west monsoons in October.

Today, Tripura is largely a Bengali community, inspite of the 19 Scheduled Tribes, that form a major chunk of the population. Hinduism, Islam, Buddhism, and Christianity are the main religions followed in Tripura.

The tribals, with a rich and varied culture, belong mainly to the Reang, Chakma, Halam and Usai communities. The majority of tribals live in elevated houses of bamboo called ‘Tong’.

To welcome, recognise, help and patronize art and culture, whether alien or native, has always been a Tripuran tradition. Rabindranath Tagore was first recognised for his genius in the Royal Court of Tripura, and his long association with the ruling family of Tripura, has inspired the Bengali community here, to adopt the Rabindra style.

To welcome, recognise, help and patronize art and culture, whether alien or native, has always been a Tripuran tradition. Rabindranath Tagore was first recognised for his genius in the Royal Court of Tripura, and his long association with the ruling family of Tripura, has inspired the Bengali community here, to adopt the Rabindra style.

Handlooms and handicrafts of Tripura reflect the inherent quality of workmanship, and uniqueness of the people. Simple materials such as bamboo, cane, palm leaves and ordinary yarn are used to create a fascinating variety of handiwork. Intricately designed handlooms and silk, cane and bamboo works are the main industries. Furniture, toys, objects of daily utility such as lamp shades, baskets, calendars, ivory work and Tripuran tribal jewellery, make shopping here a fantastic experience.

Durga Puja, Kharchi Puja, Diwali, Doljatra (Holi), Paus Sankranti Mela, Ashokashtami and Buddha Jayanti are the main fairs and festivals of Tripura. Ker Ganga and Garia Puja are the traditional tribal festivals.

Tripura has a lot to offer to the tourists. Agartala, the picturesque capital, with its beautiful palaces, gardens, hills, temples and lakes, scenic Tirthamulkh with its lakes; waterfalls and reservoir are all worth visiting. Pilak Pather and Lungthung are virtual treasure troves for those, historically inclined. Jampol hills, Rudrasagar and Neer Mahal—the lake cities, Sepahijala—the wildlife sanctuary, and the temples in and around Udaipur, are the other major places of interest in this tiny state. A visitor to Tripura, would be witnessing the awakening of a land, hitherto bound by tradition. Traditionally an agricultural land,Tripura is slowly making advances into the industrial field, with the Oil and Natural Gas Commission having set up one of its sprawling complexes on the green hills of Baramura.    

_____________________________________________________________________

..

Mizoram State WebSite
http://www.cic.nic.in/mizo1.htm

| CIC Blocks | | Block Addresses | | District Map |

 Mizoram State Web Site

Jammu & Kashmir::
ArunachalPradesh ::
Assam::
Nagaland::
Manipur::
Meghalaya::
Tripura::
Mizoram::
Sikkim::

 Perched like a lone sentinel on the tip of the north eastern border of India, idyllic Mizoram is an amalgam of the former north and south Lushai hill districts. Mizoram is a land of great natural beauty, an endless variety of landscape with rich flora and fauna, clusters of whispering pines, and quaint villages with houses on stilts.

Mizoram, or the land of Mizos (highlanders), has international boundaries with Myanmar and Bangladesh while it shares its domestic borders with the states of Assam, Manipur and Tripura. The Tropic of Cancer runs through the heart of Mizoram, and hence, it has a pleasantly temperate climate throughout the year. A land of steep hills and deep gorges, Mizoram’s highest peak ‘The Blue Mountain’ rises to a height of 2165 metres. Important rivers that flow through this hilly state are Tlawang, Sonai, Tuivawl, Kolodine and Kamaphuli.

The Mizos belonging to the Mongoloid race, are original settlers of the Shan State of Burma. Two of the tribes, the Lushai and Himar, migrated to India and occupied the Lushai hills. Mizoram was annexed in 1891 by the British as Lushai Hill district, and made a part of Assam. With Independence, Mizoram became a district of Assam. Mizoram was made a State of the Indian Union on 20th February 1987, following the historic Mizoram Peace Accord, signed between the Central Government and the Mizo National Front in June 1986.

The Mizos are divided into several tribes – the Lushais, Pawis, Paithes, Raltes, Pang, Himars, Kukis etc. Previously believers of the good spirit called Pathan, the Mizo community today is greatly influenced by Christianity. Mizos have accepted English as their medium of instruction, but the Mizo language is still widely spoken.

Though mostly Christians, the hill people have kept alive their rich cultural heritage, colourful customs and lively traditions. Festivals and dances of the Mizos have a unique tribal flavour. Other than Christmas and New Year’s Day which are the most popular festivals, Chapchar Kut (after clearing of jungles for cultivation of the jhum crop in February-March), Pawl Kut (after the harvests when the granary is full in December) and Mim Kut (dedicated to departed souls after the maize harvest in September), are the other occasions celebrated with much gusto. The most popular dances of Mizoram are Cheraw (Bamboo dance), Khuallam (dance for visitors or guests), Chheih Lam (at the end of a day’s work) and Solakar or Sarlamkai (prevalent among the Mara and Pawl tribes).

Aizwal, the scenic capital of Mizoram, its surrounding areas and the rest of the state have been developed to meet the influx of domestic and foreign tourists. Aizawl, located at nearly 4,000 feet above sea -level, is a religious and cultural centre of the Mizos. Champai, Tamdil, Vantawng fall and Thenzawl are some of the other important tourist centres in this state.

Agriculture is the main profession of the Mizos. The main pattern of agriculture followed in Mizoram, is jhum or shifting cultivation. The government is now taking steps to do away with this pattern of agriculture, which is very harmful. They have now introduced a new system of contour farming, with trenches and hedging, with the intention of switching over to permanent cultivation on hill slopes. Mizoram is famous for the fibreless ginger grown in this area.

Paddy, maize, mustard, sugarcane, sesame and potatoes are the other prominent crops grown in this area. Concerted efforts have been made to accelerate the growth of industries in Mizoram. The new industrial policy of Mizoram was framed in 1989, under which some priority industries were identified. These include agro and forest based industries, handloom and handicrafts, electronics and consumer industries.  

___________________________________________________________________

..

Sikkim State WebSite
http://www.cic.nic.in/sikkim1.htm

| CIC Blocks | | Block Addresses | | District Map |

 Sikkim State WebSite

Jammu & Kashmir::
ArunachalPradesh ::
Assam::
Nagaland::
Manipur::
Meghalaya::
Tripura::
Mizoram::
Sikkim::

 

Though small, the mountain state of Sikkim occupies an important niche of its own, in the Indian Union. The grandeur of its mountain peaks, lush valleys, fast flowing rivers, terraced hills and incredible floral wealth, make a visit to Sikkim a truly unique and unforgettable experience.

Situated on the eastern Himalayas, in the shadow of the towering Mount Kanchenjunga, which is worshipped as the principal deity, Sikkim measures approximately 100 kms from north to south and 60 kms from east to west.

Surrounded by Tibet, Nepal and Bhutan on three sides and with West Bengal on the fourth, Sikkim is a strategically significant state. It is entirely mountainous, with one – third of the land covered with dense forests of sal, sambal and bamboo, which are mostly inaccessible and unexploited. Sikkim receives heavy rainfall. It is watered by the perennial river Tista, and its tributaries, which are fed by both snow and rain.

Sikkim is, today, a state of the Indian Union, due to a combination of politically significant events. Ruled by the Gyalpo rulers as a political entity till the 18th century, Sikkim appealed to the British for help to overthrow the emigrant Bhutanese and Nepali Gorkhas, who threatened to outnumber the natives. It gradually became a protectorate of the British, and this status was transferred to India on Independence, with the Chogyal as the Maharaja. Sikkim was made the 22nd full fledged Indian state, after the Indian Parliament passed the 38th amendment to the Indian Constitution on April 26, 1975.

The inhabitants of Sikkim are beautiful people, who radiate a lot of charm, life and colour. The population of Sikkim comprises three main groups of people, the Lepchas, Bhutias and the Nepalese. The Sikkimese, are by nature, a simple, polite and non – aggressive people. Being devout Buddhists, they celebrate their festivals with a characteristic mixture of abandon and reserve.

Life in Sikkim is according to some, a never – ending festival, for there are vibrant festivities throughout the year. They are the reflection of the rich cultural heritage of the state, which combines Buddhism and Hinduism, with the original traditions of the Lepchas. The major monastries like Pemayangtse, Tsuklakhang, Enchey and Rumtek are important venues for Buddhist festivals. Pang Lhabsol, Drukpa Tseshi, Losoong, Saga Dawa and Dasain are the most popular festivals. A favourite form of celebration is drinking of ‘Chang’, the millet beer of the Himalayas. Packed into tall bamboo containers, the drink is sipped through a bamboo pipe.

The Department of Tourism, Government of Sikkim, has been organising an annual, month – long Tourist Festival in May, at the White Hall premises in Gangtok, since 1981. Flower shows, cultural programmes, film shows and exhibitions are the highlights of the festival.

One of the most colourful performances in the world are Sikkim’s mask dances, performed by Lamas in the ‘gompa’ (monastery) courtyards. The fascinating dances of Kagyat and the masked Rumtek, and Enchey ‘Chaams’ (ritual dance of the lamas), are the popular dances, which recreate legends and myths, connected with Buddhism, and the eternal triumph of good over evil.

Knotted woollen carpets with the dominating dragon emblem, and eight auspicious signs; wood carvings, Lepcha handlooms in traditional designs and rich colours for clothes, bags, linen and accessories; leather jackets and handbags, articles of homemade paper, Thanka (religious scroll paintings) and Sikkimese Dragon Jewellery make a fascinating collection of handicrafts, inspired by an age old culture.

Sikkim has an estimated 4,000 varieties of flowering plants and shrubs, that include orchids and the rare rhododendrons that cover the slopes and mountains. Ornithologists have catalogued 550 species and sub species of birds, along with 600 varieties of butterflies. Its dense forests abound with endangered species of Himalayan Bear, Musk and Barking Deer, Red Panda and Blue Sheep among other fauna.

The capital city of Gangtok, the impressive monasteries of Sikkim, the trekker’s paradise at Dzongri and the overall raw beauty and grandeur leave a visitor to this mountain state, with memories to last a lifetime. Other places of tourist interest include the Deer Park, Enchey Monastery, Orchidarium Tashi View Point, Rumtek Monastery and Phodong Monastery.

The economy of Sikkim is basically agrarian. Maize, rice, wheat, potato, large cardamom, ginger and orange are the principal crops. Ginger, potato, orange and off season vegetables are the other cash crops. Sikkim is not industrially developed, but the government has launched a number of promotional schemes to help the industry. Temi Tea Estate, the only tea estate in Sikkim with an area of around 400 acres, has earned a reputation both in domestic and foreign markets, for its superior quality tea. A number of industrial units have also come up in the state in the area of fruit jams and juices, bakery products, beer, plastic goods, wrist watches and leather goods. At the same time, consistent efforts have been made to promote and preserve traditional arts and crafts, such as wood carving, carpet weaving, thanka painting, and traditional handlooms.

____________________________________________________________________________

..

Jammu State Web Site

http://www.cic.nic.in/jammu1.htm

  | CIC Blocks | | Block Addresses |

 

Jammu & Kashmir::
ArunachalPradesh ::
Assam::
Nagaland::
Manipur::
Meghalaya::
Tripura::
Mizoram::
Sikkim::

 

Perched among the lofty snow-sprinkled mighty Himalayan ranges, the emerald blue skies peeping through the chinks of the clouds, the tall Chinar trees swaying to the rhythm of the gusts of wind, all condense into a kindly smile, forming the lovely state of Jammu and Kashmir.

Situated between 32.17 degree and 36.58 degree north latitude and 37.26 degree and 80.30 degree east longitude, the total area of the State is 22,22,236 sq. kms

Jammu and Kashmir comprises of three natural divisions, namely Jammu, Kashmir and Ladakh. For administrative purposes, the state is divided into two main divisions, i.e., Kashmir and Jammu Provinces. There are 14 districts out of which 8 are in Kashmir province and 6 are in Jammu. and they comprise of 135 Blocks divided in 14 Districts.

Kashmir is famous for its natural beauty and has often been referred to as the ‘Switzerland of the East’. The heart of the area is the fertile Vale of Kashmir (known as The Valley), which lies between the Himalayas and the Pir Panjal mountain range. Here the climate is mild and the soil well watered. The colorful flower season starts from the middle of March and April. May and June find fruit trees laden with many hued carpets of flowers decking the meadows and hill slopes.

Jammu has numerous temples in its lap and hence called the City of Temples. The view of the dawn and dusk of this sacred city is simply enchanting.

The climate of the state ranges from the burning and the scorching heat of the plains of (Jammu Division) to the snow-capped heights of Gulmarg (Kashmir) and the mud peak of Mount Godwin Austin (Ladakh) 21,265 feet above sea level, the second highest in the world. All these represent the three different climatic zones.

The State of Jammu & Kashmir has a fair share of rivers and the Jhelum is the main waterway of the valley of Kashmir whereas Tawi is the main waterway in Jammu region in addition to Chenab. The Indus is the main waterway in the Ladakh Region. A number of lakes are found in the State of Jammu and Kashmir. Most of them are in the Kashmir Valley namely Dal, Wular and Anchar.

Jammu and Kashmir abounds in rich flora (vegetation, forests). The state, described as ‘paradise’ on earth, is full of many hues of wood and game. The most magnificent of the Kashmir trees is the Chinar found throughout the valley.

Jammu and Kashmir State is full of natural resources of great economic potential. Agriculture is the main occupation of the State. The other areas are wood and handicrafts Industry and forest based products. Jammu & Kashmir is well known for its wool and, in particular, its shawls and carpets. Kashmiri handicrafts are known throughout the world for their exquisite craftsmanship. Much of the farmland is under intense cultivation, producing corn, wheat, rice and saffron amongst other crops. Fruit and nuts are also produced in quantities including pears, apples and walnuts.

In population, the State is one of the smallest in the country and accounts for less than one percent of the people enumerated in 1981. One fifth of the population in J&K resides in urban areas. 23.83 % population has been recorded as urban in the state against the National Average of 25.72%. Jammu city has recorded very rapid growth and presently ranks as the 48th biggest city in the country. Besides the cities of Jammu and Srinagar, other important towns are the district headquarters of Anantnag, Pulwama, Badgam, Baramulla, Kupwara, Udhampur, Kathua, Rajouri ,Poonch ,Doda, Leh and Kargil. The remaining towns continue to have many rural features and pursuits reflecting the state’s predominant Agro-pastoral economy.

The colorful flower season starts from the middle of March and April. May and June find fruit trees laden with many hued carpets of flowers decking the meadows and hill slopes.

____________________________________________________________________

http://mizoram.nic.in/
| CIC Blocks | | Block Addresses | | District Map |

 http://mizoram.nic.in/ Districts=8
Blocks = 26

Jammu & Kashmir ::
ArunachalPradesh
::
Assam::
Nagaland::
Manipur::
Meghalaya::
Tripura::
Mizoram::
Sikkim::

 The districts where CICs are set up is given below :
Click on a district name to obtain the block-wise details of that district.

Aizawal, Champai, Chhimtuipui
Kolasib, Lawngtlai, Lunglei,  
Mamit,  Saiha 

——————————————————————————————-

Advertisements

Leave a Reply

Please log in using one of these methods to post your comment:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s

 
%d bloggers like this: