eGovernance in India

Improving eGovernance in INDIA

Build an 8 PS3 supercomputer

Posted by egovindia on November 3, 2007

Build an 8 PS3 supercomputer

ElcomSoft Files Patent for Revolutionary Technique to Recover Lost Passwords Quickly
ElcomSoft Co.Ltd. has discovered and filed for a US patent on a breakthrough technology that will decrease the time that it takes to perform password recovery by a factor of up to 25. ElcomSoft has harnessed the combined power of a PC’s Central Processing Unit (CPU) and its video card’s Graphics Processing Unit (GPU). The resulting hardware/software powerhouse will allow cryptology professionals to build affordable PCs that will work like supercomputers when recovering lost passwords.
Moscow, Russia (PRWEB) October 22, 2007 — ElcomSoft Co.Ltd. has discovered and filed for a US patent on a breakthrough technology that will decrease the time that it takes to perform password recovery by a factor of up to 25. ElcomSoft has harnessed the combined power of a PC’s Central Processing Unit (CPU) and its video card’s Graphics Processing Unit (GPU). The resulting hardware/software powerhouse will allow cryptology professionals to build affordable PCs that will work like supercomputers when recovering lost passwords.
ElcomSoft, a leader in software cryptology and forensics, offers a wide range of password recovery solutions. Used by businesses, law enforcement agencies, and intelligence organizations worldwide, ElcomSoft has pioneered many software innovations that have made it easier for officials to recover lost passwords from the operating system, Microsoft Office products, and dozens of other popular software applications. Their latest discovery will enable organizations to recover passwords much more quickly, without expensive hardware or software.
Using the “brute force” technique of recovering passwords, it was possible, though time-consuming, to recover passwords from popular applications. For example, the logon password for Windows Vista might be an eight-character string composed of uppercase and lowercase alphabetic characters. There would about 55 trillion (52 to the eighth power) possible passwords. Windows Vista uses NTLM hashing by default, so using a modern dual-core PC you could test up to 10,000,000 passwords per second, and perform a complete analysis in about two months. With ElcomSoft’s new technology, the process would take only three to five days, depending upon the CPU and GPU.
Until recently, graphic cards’ GPUs couldn’t be used for applications such as password recovery. Older graphics chips could only perform floating-point calculations, and most cryptography algorithms require fixed-point mathematics. Today’s chips can process fixed-point calculations. And with as much as 1.5 Gb of onboard video memory and up to 128 processing units, these powerful GPU chips are much more effective than CPUs in performing many of these calculations.
In February 2007, NVIDIA, the worldwide leader in programmable graphics processor technologies, launched CUDA, a C-Compiler and developer’s kit that gives software developers access to the parallel processing power of the GPU through the standard language of C. NVIDIA GPUs (GeForce 8 and above) act as multiprocessors, with multiple registers and shared memory and cache. ElcomSoft has harnessed their computing power, and will be incorporating this patent-pending technology into their entire family of enterprise password recovery applications. Since high-end PC mother boards can work with four separate video cards, the future is bright for even faster password recovery applications.
Preliminary tests using Elcomsoft Distributed Password Recovery product to recover Windows NTLM logon passwords show that the recovery speed has increased by a factor of twenty, simply by hooking up with a $150 video card’s onboard GPU. ElcomSoft expects to find similar results as this new technology is incorporated into their password recovery products for Microsoft Office, PGP, and dozens of other popular applications.

To learn more about ElcomSoft’s new technology, please visit http://gpu.elcomsof t.com.
http://www.prweb. com/releases/ NVIDIA/GeForce/ prweb562303. htm

Archis Gore <archisgore@yahoo. com> wrote: I was only a matter of time before someone picked up a cell processor for
high-perf computing (which was what they were meant to do). What really
impressed me was someone actually going out and picking up a PS3 and using it.

However, while the enthusiasm is great, I’d point out two things to consider
when building your own super-computer:

1. The definition of supercomputer will always keep upgrading. Today my
cellphone has a 400Mhz processor (4 times faster than my pentium from 1998). So
the minute someone builds 8 PS3s, IBM/Sun can go and put 150,000 cells on
ultra-thin super-efficient boards with customized network stacks of 0.000001
second latency, etc. and outbeat your home-made “supercomputer” . (Please note:
I’m not criticising – just saying that that’s how reality is)

2. To use all those GFlops is not trivial. The upside of AMD and Intel’s
multicore processors as opposed to the cell is that utilizing 10 cores is a lot
easier (just write a multithreaded program and you’re done). Today putting MPI
on your college labs and coding on it might give you a way simpler programming
model than one with 8 PS3s. In fact this is why while “technically superior”,
you don’t see a PS3 really showing the value-add on the gaming market and is at
a distant 3rd place behind Wii and XBox. At the end of the day, if you can’t
use all that power, it doesn’t exist.

This does seem to be a good step in the right direction though, and there’s
going to be a ton of money in whoever can provide a good programming model to
enable rapid app development on multicores – especially as multicores begin
entering mobiles soon.

–Archis

— sudhanwa Jogalekar <sudhanwa.com@ gmail.com> wrote:

> Great reading!! Make your own supercomputer! !
>
> Less than a 10th the cost per GFlop of the $2500 supercomputer
> Take 8 PS 3 consoles, Yellow Dog Linux, a Gigabit Ethernet switch and
> your favorite protein folding or gravitational wave modeling codes and
> you’re doing real science. On a Playstation!
>
> Read more here: http://blogs. zdnet.com/ storage/? p=220&tag= nl.e539
>
> — Sudhanwa
>
> !~!~!~!~!~!~ !~!~!~!~! ~!~!~!~!~ !~!~!~!~! ~!~!~!~!~ !~!~!~!~! ~!~!~!~!~ !~!~!~!~
> Have you tried the new “FREE” Marathi font “Aksharyogini” we have released?
>
> News!! Aksharyogini font will now be available in debian Indic fonts
> package!!
>
> Please get it from http://aksharyogini .sudhanwa. com
> ~!~!~!~!~!~! ~!~!~!~!~ !~!~!~!~! ~!~!~!~!~ !~!~!~!~! ~!~!~!~!~ !~!~!~!~! ~!~!~!~~
> http://www.sudhanwa. com
>

E-mail: archisgore@yahoo. com
Homepage: http://www.geocitie s.com/archisgore

“… one of the main causes of the fall of the Roman Empire was that, lacking zero, they had no way to indicate successful termination of their C programs.” — Robert Firth.

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